Kiteboarding

Kiteboarding

Kiteboarding or kitesurfing, is an extreme sport where the kiteboarder harnesses the power of the wind with a large controllable power kite to be propelled across the water, land, or snow. combines aspects of sailing, surfing, windsurfing, skateboarding, snowboarding, wakeboarding and paragliding. It is among the less expensive and the more convenient of the sailing sports.

After some concepts emerged in the late 1970s and early 1980s, some designs were successfully experimented, the sport received a wider audience in the late 1990s and became mainstream at the turn of the century. It has freestyle, wave-riding and racing competitions. The sport held the speed sailing record, reaching 55.65 kn (103.06 km/h) before being eclipsed by the 65.45 kn (121.21 km/h) Vestas Sailrocket. Worldwide, there is 1.5 million kitesurfers, while the industry sell around 100,000 to 150,000 kites per year.

Most power kites are leading edge inflatable kites, sometimes foil kites, they are attached by around 20 m (66 ft) flying lines to a control bar and a harness. The kitesurfer rides on a bidirectional board (a "twin-tip", similar to a wakeboard) or a directional surfboard, sometimes on a foilboard. He often wears a wetsuit in mild to cold waters. Safety was sensitive in the beginning, with injuries and some fatalities, but has improved with better equipment and instruction.

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